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Tuesday, 27 June 2017 00:00

Avoiding Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that may cause a stabbing pain in the heel. As a result, someone who has the condition may find common activities such as running and walking to be extremely painful. Plantar fasciitis occurs when there is an injury of the plantar fascia--the long structure at the base of the foot that connects the heel to the toes. Stretching has been proven to be effective in alleviating pain related to plantar fasciitis, so it is important that those with the condition incorporate stretching into their daily routines.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Marc Keys  from Marc. S. Keys, DPM. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Jackson and Adrian, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 20 June 2017 00:00

How to Treat Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection that occurs between the toes. Symptoms of the condition are itchy, dry, red, scaly skin that tends to worsen in the summer when the weather is humid. The infection itself is usually contracted by walking around barefoot in public areas such as locker rooms or gym showers. Treatments for athlete’s foot come in creams, sprays, liquids, and powders, and they will help stop the fungus from growing. If you have athlete’s foot, be sure to wash your feet prior to applying the treatment to the skin and surrounding area.  Also, do not apply to open wounds. Contact a podiatrist for tips on how to prevent and treat athlete's foot.

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Marc Keys from Marc. S. Keys, DPM.  Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Jackson and Adrian, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Athlete's Foot

Pitcher Jon Gray of the Colorado Rockies has been out recently with a stress fracture in his left foot. After being in a walking boot for six weeks, the pitcher has finally been cleared to resume baseball activity. After throwing a 41 pitch bullpen session, Gray stated “Everything on the mound feels great. I hadn't gripped a changeup in two weeks. And I threw two of them and they were the best I'd ever thrown.” Gray is expected to begin a rehab assignment soon and the Rockies hope he will be able to rejoin the team as soon as possible.

Activities where too much pressure is put on the feet can cause stress fractures. To learn more, contact Dr. Marc Keys from Marc. S. Keys, DPM. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep your pain free and on your feet.

Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

Stress fractures occur in the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken from too much or too little use.  The feet and ankles then lose support when walking or running from the impact of the ground. Since there is no protection, the bones receive the full impact of each step. Stress on the feet can cause cracks to form in the bones, thus creating stress fractures.

What are Stress Fractures?

Stress fractures occur frequently in individuals whose daily activities cause great impact on the feet and ankles. Stress factors are most common among:

  • Runners                                  
  • People affected with Osteoporosis
  • Tennis or basketball players
  • Gymnasts
  • High impact workouts

Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures and can be constant or intermittent. It will often cause sharp or dull pain with swelling and tenderness. Engaging in any kind of activity which involves high impact will aggravate pain.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Jackson and Adrian, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle
Monday, 05 June 2017 00:00

Tips for Finding Your Perfect Shoe

The first step to getting into a proper running routine is to make sure you are wearing the right running shoes. The proper shoe will help to correct biomechanical issues and prevent injury. You should always go to a sneaker store that specializes in running shoes so that the workers can help you find a sneaker that fits your foot strike. There are three main types of runners based on foot strikes: overpronators (when the foot rolls inward too much), neutral pronators (feet roll inward slightly), and supinators (feet don’t roll inward enough). Certain running shoe stores will have you run on a treadmill so that the workers can best determine which shoe type will fit you properly. You will know the shoe is a good fit if you “feel like you want to go run immediately," said runner Dimity McDowell.

If you are a runner, wearing the right running shoe is essential. For more information, contact Dr. Marc Keys from Marc. S. Keys, DPM. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Choosing the Right Running Shoe for Your Foot Type

To increase performance and avoid the risk of injury, it is important to choose the right running shoe based on your foot type. The general design of running shoes revolves around pronation, which is how the ankle rolls from outside to inside when the foot strikes the ground.

  • Neutral runners are able to choose from a wide variety of shoes, including minimalist shoes or even going barefoot.
  • Runners who overpronate, or experience an over-abundance of ankle rolling, should choose shoes that provide extra motion control and stability.
  • Runners who underpronate, or supinate, have feet that have high arches and lack flexibility, preventing shock absorption. They require shoes with more flexibility and cushion.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Jackson and Adrian, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Choosing the Right Running Shoe for Your Foot Type
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